TECHNICAL SERVICE BULLETINS (TSB’S) ARE IMPORTANT!

There can be several or 100 Technical Service Bulletins on a vehicle.  These are issued by the manufacturer for several reasons.  Perhaps they found a problem with something simple like a defective material in a seal which then causes a leak.  That doesn’t sound very ominous.  However, if that seal was part of your engine or transmission, it could be very important.   If enough fluid leaked out, it could do expensive damage.  Or, perhaps it was a result of a faulty ignition switch like GM customers have been experiencing.  We now know that there should have been a recall on the Cobalt switch.  Ultimately a “recall” on this switch was issued in 2010.  However, the Cobalt came out in 2005.  Keep in mind that a recall can be issued because a “label” was missing.  So, it is not always life threatening.

The Technical Service Bulletins are important because they offer information to repair shops for “known” problems with your vehicle.  They are issued by the manufacturers.  A good shop will check those bulletins.  Often they may not mention anything to you because it is not deemed a safety or hazardous condition.  It is always good to ask your auto mechanic if there are any bulletins that should give you reason for concern.

 

Sometimes consumers will ignore “recalls” they receive in the mail because they deem them irrelevant.  If it was a recall for a door lock malfunction, you might not feel it was important.  Or, maybe you would if you had children in the vehicle.  At any rate, recalls should be dealt with in a timely manner.  Recalls can be found at http://www.recalls.gov/nhtsa.html and you can also subscribe to receive them electronically for your vehicle.  You can also search for safety issues and/or file a complaint at http://www.safercar.gov/Vehicle+Owners.  Recalls are generally performed by the dealership and at no charge to you.

Technical Service Bulletins can be found at http://www.nhtsa.gov/cars/problems/ which posts recalls and investigations.  This is a government sight concerning safety but also lists customer complaints and compliance testing.  Remember, that TSB’s are not free as they are issued as a recommendation to the dealership that something has been improved or perhaps obsoleted for a better result.  Always ask if the TSB needs to be done for a safety concern or exactly why it was issued and what the cost would be for the repair.  It is always prudent to obtain at least two (preferably three) quotes for any major repair work.

Keep in mind that sometimes a TSB or a Recall is important for several reasons beyond perhaps the obvious.  A TSB can be issued due to a faulty manufacturing process or even the type of metal that may have been used on a part at that particular moment in time.  Later they find that the metal used is deteriorating and causing subsequent damage.  Be sure to ask your technician what risk is involved if you choose not to have the work performed.

There can be several or 100 Technical Service Bulletins on a vehicle.  These are issued by the manufacturer for several reasons.  Perhaps they found a problem with something simple like a defective material in a seal which then causes a leak.  That doesn’t sound very ominous.  However, if that seal was part of your engine or transmission, it could be very important.   If enough fluid leaked out, it could do expensive damage.  Or, perhaps it was a result of a faulty ignition switch like GM customers have been experiencing.  We now know that there should have been a recall on the Cobalt switch.  Ultimately a “recall” on this switch was issued in 2010.  However, the Cobalt came out in 2005.  Keep in mind that a recall can be issued because a “label” was missing.  So, it is not always life threatening.

The Technical Service Bulletins are important because they offer information to repair shops for “known” problems with your vehicle.  They are issued by the manufacturers.  A good shop will check those bulletins.  Often they may not mention anything to you because it is not deemed a safety or hazardous condition.  It is always good to ask your auto mechanic if there are any bulletins that should give you reason for concerN.

Sometimes consumers will ignore “recalls” they receive in the mail because they deem them irrelevant.  If it was a recall for a door lock malfunction, you might not feel it was important.  Or, maybe you would if you had children in the vehicle.  At any rate, recalls should be dealt with in a timely manner.  Recalls can be found at http://www.recalls.gov/nhtsa.html and you can also subscribe to receive them electronically for your vehicle.  You can also search for safety issues and/or file a complaint at http://www.safercar.gov/Vehicle+Owners.  Recalls are generally performed by the dealership and at no charge to you.

Technical Service Bulletins can be found at http://www.nhtsa.gov/cars/problems/ which posts recalls and investigations.  This is a government sight concerning safety but also lists customer complaints and compliance testing.  Remember, that TSB’s are not free as they are issued as a recommendation to the dealership that something has been improved or perhaps obsoleted for a better result.  Always ask if the TSB needs to be done for a safety concern or exactly why it was issued and what the cost would be for the repair.  It is always prudent to obtain at least two (preferably three) quotes for any major repair work.

Keep in mind that sometimes a TSB or a Recall is important for several reasons beyond perhaps the obvious.  A TSB can be issued due to a faulty manufacturing process or even the type of metal that may have been used on a part at that particular moment in time.  Later they find that the metal used is deteriorating and causing subsequent damage.  Be sure to ask your technician what risk is involved if you choose not to have the work performed.

 

 

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